Stay tuned for 2021 Expo Registration to open!

Questions? Please contact:

ncexpo@dhhs.nc.gov

Preconference Sessions – Friday, May 14, 2021

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Education Program Coordinator/Director Workshop

NC OEMS

The purpose of the Program Coordinators workshop is to educate both the new and established EMS program director the rules and regulatory processes related to their role in the educational institution. Topics include but are not limited to responsibilities, course requirements, record keeping, education plans, types of educational institutions and compliance.

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NREMT Refresher Course 

Chris Goenner

The North Carolina Association of EMS Educators will again be presenting our annual “Paramedic Refresher Course”. Attendees will receive 14.5 hours of their National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) National Continued Competency Program. Take this course, along with either last year’s session or next year’s session, participants will receive their required 30 hours of National Continued Competencies to re-certify with NREMT.

General Sessions – Monday, May 17, 2021

9:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Guilford F/G

Welcome/Opening Remarks

Chief Tom Mitchell

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM
Guilford F/G

TBD

 

11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Guilford F/G

The Night I Almost Jumped: EMS Culture and EMS Suicide

Matthew Giacopelli

This is a look into some of the reasons why an EMS provider may contemplate, and, ultimately, complete suicide. The speaker will talk about his own bout with depression and near suicide, and how he overcame it. Case studies of EMS providers who have completed suicide will be presented. The stigma surrounding mental health in Emergency Services, and what can be done to break it, will be discussed. The audience will then be provided with suggestions for coping mechanisms, and tips to build resiliency in themselves, and those around them.

 

Concurrent Sessions – Monday, October 1, 2018

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Crisis Intervention Team Course (Day 3)

Tara Tucker

The Crisis Intervention Team program teaches first responders practical skills to help them interact safely and effectively with persons with mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disability needs. The curriculum includes information about common signs and symptoms of behavioral health concerns, information about community resources, opportunities to hear from individuals and family members, and training in de-escalation and crisis intervention. The goals of CIT are to promote the safe resolution of crises, to divert individuals from jail and the emergency department, and to offer community members access to care and opportunities for service engagement.

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

NC Association of EMS Educators Updates and Planning Meeting

 

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Trouble Shooting Invasive Line Waveforms

Julius McAdams

Invasive lines provide a window in to a patient’s second to second hemodynamic status and a properly working invasive line can be an incredible asset during critical care patient care. Poorly working invasive lines on the other hand can leave providers frustrated and could jepordize patient safety. This presentation provides you with strategies to identify, and correct, common problems that impact invasive lines.

 

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Identifying Signs of Impairment

Eric Sweden

 With a changing culture of drugs of abuse, we need to be able to identify and articulate the signs of impairment before it becomes intoxication. By redefining the term DRUG, we have a better understanding and identification of impairment both within our patients and our profession. Prescription? OTC? Illicit? Let’s put drugs into categories based on a known pattern of signs and symptoms to easier identify and treat it.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

What Drowning Taught Me About Leadership

Terrence Sheehy

Lifeguards learn to distinguish effective swimming, from ineffective swimming, as ineffective swimmers are more likely to drown. Just like a drowning person is a crisis, so can a panicked leader be a crisis, with the ability to bring down an entire agency. Learn to recognize the signs, and how you can avoid these pitfalls.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

TBD

    1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

    After Airway:Best Practices in Ventilation

    Kevin Collopy

     Successful airway placement has been the focus of research and criticism for several years. Once an airway is placed our job of airway management is far from over. After airway placement prehospital providers need continuously reassess the airway as well as provide proper breathing management. This presentation introduces best practices for continued airway protection and evaluation, improved breathing and ventilation care, utilization of end tidal carbon dioxide, and how to plan for the lost airway. Come join in a discussion on how to anticipate and manage what might come up the airway, maximize oxygen administration as well as carbon dioxide elimination, effectively use a bag valve mask to prevent increased intrathoracic pressure, and how to position a patient to make your job easier!

    1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

    Use of Whole Blood by Ground 911 System – Bleeding

    David Grovdahl

    Onslow County EMS, a ground based 911 system, has been using whole blood in trauma resuscitation since 2019. Whole blood has demonstrated a significant advancement in trauma resuscitation in programs in Texas and that has been replicated in North Carolina. The logistics and use of whole blood has been greatly simplified. Learn why whole blood signals a paradigm shift in prehospital trauma care and how to set up a whole blood program at your system.

    1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

    Data Quality: Advancing EMS Operations and Patient Care

    Paul Allen

    In the medical field, it’s not just about measuring quality assurance, it’s also about addressing quality improvement. Good data quality in ePCR documentation leads to opportunities for advancing how EMS systems operate and provide patient care. How do you improve on what you are already doing? This session will help you with ideas to get started.

    3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

    Pediatric DKA Management

     Sarah Thomas

    In this session we will discuss best practice and procedure for management of pediatric DKA patients in the prehospital setting. From point of care testing to insulin administration; a discussion of evidence based practice in use in the ICU and how we can bring that to the prehospital setting. We will look at how early targeted care can improve outcomes and length of stay for these patients.  

    3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

    Performance Improvement or Performance Punishment

     Alan Brook 

     Have you ever been punished for mistakes that you have made in the field? Join us as we discuss some best practices for a successful Performance Improvement model. We will explain “just culture” and how it is a critical element of a well-rounded performance improvement process. Through case studies at the end of this session you will understand the steps needed to take your performance improvement department to the next level. Objectives: 1. Define performance improvement. 2. Define “just culture”. 3. Review the steps in the PI process.

    3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

    Leading into the Unknown-Leadership and Strategy for Community Paramedic Programs

    Josh Holloman

     As Community Paramedic programs continue to develop across our profession, having the right type of leadership will determine the success of our new mission. How do we lead in situations we have never faced? Working with healthcare professionals such as physicians, executives, insurance officials and elected leaders takes specific traits and special training. Teaching our EMS providers to operate in this proactive and preventive realm of healthcare takes a special approach. Getting buy in from local officials and the community is not easy, but our programs depends on it. Join me for a discussion of best practices of leadership in this new and changing healthcare landscape.

    3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

    Perpetuation of a Stigma

    Beth Young

    The perpetuation of stigma that occurs from a lack of addiction education heavily impacts the future of health and human sciences disciplines. Shifting student beliefs towards addiction is necessary for improved client care. This presentation shares findings from a quantitative research project which assessed student beliefs towards addictive disorders. Additionally, it will guide participants in identifying how they can integrate education on addictive disorders into their curriculum.

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Making Your Presentation Count:10 ways to make your in-services more informative, memorable and enjoyable 

       John Carrico

      Have you ever been “read” an entire power point presentation? Watched an instructor awkwardly attempt to get “participation” from a silent audience? Written off a presenter because the topic was over your head? This presentation is designed to help our EMS educators and instructors avoid these and other pitfalls while learning how to enhance their lessons and maximize the learning experience of their audiences.

       

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Use of Suboxone by NC EMS Agency as a Bridge to Connect Opiate Overdose Patients to Treatment

      David Grovdahl

      Onslow County EMS is participating in a National Institute of Health study to determine the effectiveness of community paramedic administered suboxone or subutex as a bridge for patients who have already or are at risk for opiate overdose as a bridge until the patient can be connected to a medication assisted treatment (MAT) program for recovery intervention.

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Emerging Risks Issues

       Matthew Streger

      This lecture is intended to address cutting edge risk management and legal issues at the time of the Conference. We will select the topics approximately 60 days in advance of the actual lecture so they are the most relevant topics facing EMS leaders and agencies at the time. Examples of representative topics include patient-provider boundary issues, social media issues, HIPAA enforcement actions, relevant developments in EMS litigation nationwide, and safety issues.

      Concurrent Sessions – Tuesday, May 18, 2020

      8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

      Crisis Intervention Team Course (Day 4)

      Tara Tucker

      The Crisis Intervention Team program teaches first responders practical skills to help them interact safely and effectively with persons with mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disability needs. The curriculum includes information about common signs and symptoms of behavioral health concerns, information about community resources, opportunities to hear from individuals and family members, and training in de-escalation and crisis intervention. The goals of CIT are to promote the safe resolution of crises, to divert individuals from jail and the emergency department, and to offer community members access to care and opportunities for service engagement.

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Rapid Sequence Intubation: What is the Rush?

       Matt Rollins

       Drug assisted intubation, often called “rapid sequence intubation”, remains a highly debated topic based on its high risk and potential negative outcomes if performed poorly. Pre-hospital providers (as well as in-hospital providers) often receive repetitive instruction and hands-on practice with the simple process of traditional intubation on a manikin. How can we better plan and prepare for the overall process and potential complications associated with drug assisted or rapid sequence intubation? Integrating updated practices for optimized technique, advanced technological equipment, and reduced cognitive load through prepared checklists ultimately give providers the best chance for success when performing an drug-assisted intubation. 

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Beyond Response Code-An EMS Providers Guide to Understanding Emergency Medical Dispatch

      Josh Holloman

       As emergency medical dispatch (EMD) becomes increasingly complex, enhanced and available across the nation, it is important that EMS providers understand the process of emergency call taking and how medical determinates are reached. This course will assist the EMS provider in understanding how Emergency Medical Dispatchers are trained and how chief complaints are screened and dispatched.

       

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Case Presentations from the Beach

      Terrence Sheehy

      Ever wondered what calls are like in one of the other 99 counties in North Carolina? When you hear about the beach, you probably think about getting tan while drinking something with an umbrella in it. We are going to review several case studies with outcomes, seeing how geography affects patient care, and examine what someone thought was “just another day at the beach”.

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Sports Injury Scenarios

      Hinshaw & Balzuki

      description on the way

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Until all the Pieces Fit

      Chris Ebright

       As a pre-hospital care provider, on average, you are seven times more likely to encounter a patient diagnosed with autism. It is not one condition, but rather a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and non-verbal communication. As a result, these patients can present to EMS providers with unique assessment and management challenges. This presentation will explain the autism spectrum as well as certain notable characteristics of these patients to consider when performing an assessment and rendering medical treatment.

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Managing Change in a Hyper-Turbulent Time

      Matt Zavadsky

       We are in the midst of a ‘perfect storm’ – shifting economic forces require EMS agencies to consider changes in operational delivery systems, human resources, operations & deployment and revenue cycle management.  Often, this leads to re-evaluating and potentially changing long-held beliefs about every aspect of your organization and operations.  How you manage change could mean success (Google, Lyft) or failure (Blockbuster, Kodak, MySpace).  This session will highlight successful strategies to successfully manage organizational change, providing the ‘nimbleness’ necessary to navigate the choppy waters.

       

      Learning Objective(s):

      • Learn how to effectively monitor the landscape that will impact your organization
      • Understand the human, cultural, financial and operational impacts of change
      • Learn how to help your team take “ownership” of the change
      • Learn ways to effectively communicate change within your organization

      9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

      Bad Bosses

      Matthew Streger

       Have you ever worked for a bad boss? Someone who is volatile, or a micromanager, or someone who is paranoid? Is it possible that YOU are a bad boss? This lecture will look at some common types of dysfunctional managers, coping mechanisms if you are stuck with one, how to identify if you are a bad boss, and how you can correct negative leadership.

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      Capnography the Best Vital Sign 

      Edd Shope

      Capnography provides the astute provider with a wealth of patient information and is one of the most poorly understood vital signs. This presentation reviews the science behind and application of capnography in critical care patient management and describes how the numbers and waveforms integrate into ongoing patient management. 

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      Give a dog a bone! The benefits of a therapy dog and how your department can use one. 

      Alan Brook

      Provider mental health is at the forefront of everyone’s mind. Join us as we discuss how to incorporate a therapy dog program into your department. This kind of program can have dramatically positive affects towards the mental health of staff while also helping to combat PTSD, burn-out, compassion fatigue, etc. The end-goal is to reduce suicide rates, substance abuse, and PTSD affected individuals. Come meet Titan the Therapy Dog as we discuss how to get this accomplished.

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      What can you do in 5 minutes? 

      Carl McKnight

      5 minutes can be an eternity or a flash in time. Its what we do with that 5 minutes that is so important. In today’s society the concept of good to great patient care varies with the caregiver. How you manage your time relates directly to how impactful you may be and how you are received. 5 minutes can make a difference!

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      Community Paramedicine and Emergency Services: Working Together

      Suzanne King

      Community paramedicine and mobile integrated health programs have become a necessary and important part of emergency services. However, the relationship between the community paramedic program and EMS is not always well defined. This presentation will explore this relationship and how these emergency services personnel can work more effectively together to improve the outcomes for the patient populations, the EMS system, and the Community Paramedic program.

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      Rainbow and Rabbit Holes

      Angie Stewart

       Psychological trauma has a unique way of throwing us into an alternative world full of unknowns, loss, and confusion. Dorothy and Alice’s journeys have a similar parallel to what each of us may encounter when thrown into this strange land. These ladies will allow us to explore what that journey looks like without hitting any triggers. During this journey, we will explore how to grow and successfully navigate that new-found world and ways to navigate it to get back “home”.

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      Medical Director Update – Part 1

      Tripp Winslow

      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

      Patient Restraints: The Scene is NOT Safe

      David Dalton

      Patient restraint is one of the most dangerous scenarios in prehospital medicine, placing both patient and provider in harm’s way. 80% of EMS professionals have been assaulted while trying to place a patient in physical restraints; 75% have seen a restrained patient escape from a restraint device. Restraint is also one of the top liability concerns for EMS, resulting in claims of civil rights violations, gross negligence, & wrongful death. And yet, restraint education is virtually non-existent. As a result, many providers have had to learn the hard way. All it takes is just one bad day. This program presents strategies, procedures, and resources for performing safe, effective, & legal restraint.

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      Ventilator Strategies of the Diseased Lung

      Matt Hixon & Bryan Dixon

       Your ventilator is on your patient, settings are established, but now what? This presentation takes ventilator settings and pushes the participant to transition to ventilator management. Come understand how to recognize and address common ventilator associated challenges when managing patietns with diseased lungs.

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      Understanding, Interacting and Treating Sexual Assault Patients

      Matthew Higginson

      Sexual Assault patients face a multitude of problems and most EMS schools dedicate only a paragraph to these patients. Problems include but are not limited to trauma, psychiatric, complications with after care, and even treatments/interactions with providers. Many victims will not seek medical care due to shame and fears that they will not be believed.

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      Low Down on the High Side

      Ken Crumpler

       Crashes involving motorcycles, both on road and off road, are different than crashes with cars or trucks. There is a greater chance of death, increased severity and diversity of injuries, and an increased chance of fuel and fluid spill. The responder will learn how to identify potential injuries, learn about and gain skills to properly remove common safety equipment worn by motorcyclists.

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      Medical Director Update – Part 2

      Tripp Winslow

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      Wolves in Sheep Clothing 

       Chris Ebright

      Sepsis is a common clinical syndrome caused by an unchecked inflammatory response to infection. Several diseases closely resemble a septic presentation by mimicking its clinical pathophysiology. If these various conditions are not taken into consideration while examining a patient with a potential diagnosis of sepsis, there is a higher potential for increased mortality and morbidity. This presentation will explain what mimics you should evaluate for, and what history and physical exam findings that can assist you differentiating these conditions from sepsis.

       

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      “I’m from the Government I’m here to help”- communication skills for life

      Eric Sweden

      We often lack skills to effectively communicate. Instead of learning how we are different, lets learn how we are all alike. Talking about human universals and empathy, we can generate voluntary compliance in both our professional and personal lives.

      1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

      Involuntary Transport : Patient Care of Taking Custody

      David Dalton

      In California, a well-meaning EMT was found grossly negligent after his restrained, suicidal patient escaped from the ambulance and was struck by an oncoming vehicle. In Wyoming, paramedics found themselves facing a 4th Amendment violation after forcing a suicidal patient to go to the hospital. In contrast, a New York court rules that an ER physician has no legal authority to hold an intoxicated patient against his will. Whether its a refusal or an involuntary transport, the litigation risk for EMS is high. Where is the line that separates patient care from taking custody? This session seeks to answer this question and more, providing participants with confidence and peace of mind.

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Reviewing Lab Values through the eyes of a 12-Lead

      John Carrico 

       Understanding the clinical impacts lab value changes will have on patients is a essential critical care transport skill. However, too often these changes are though of by starting with known lab values. This presentation helps participaints use the 12-lead ECG to identify changes that are associated with lab value changes. Come learn how to think about labs by looking at the patient first!

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Beautiful Mess

      Angie Stewart

       Heroes are made and broken by the events they experience. They are defined by their actions when faced with adversity. Each emotion is put to the test and individuals have to find their true self in the end. We will explore how to balance our emotions to make us more resilient as we face the obstacles that come with the job. When we fail to control our emotions, we begin to make awful decisions. We will look at acknowledging the different emotions to find a new level of happiness.

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      EMS Research: A Year in Review 

      Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research

      This session focuses on a review of the research abstracts produced and published as a result of EMS research
      summits held by the Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research. Come join us to hear presentations from the primary investigators about what we have discovered! Through our collaborative research summits, the Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research has helped in the production of many quality research projects throughout the year that were accepted for presentation, publication, or both! This session allows the Primary Investigators involved in the studies to give a brief presentation on their research, including how the results may be impactful to different aspects of the EMS profession. Time will be provided in between presentations for attendees to ask questions and discuss results.

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      What I wish I knew before the white shirt

       Terrence Sheehy

      A retrospective look at the things I wish I knew before being promoted. We will spend time reviewing the buddy to boss transition, and roleplaying some common issues you’re likely to encounter as a new supervisor. By learning from somebody who is in a leadership role, you are better able to prepare yourself to assume a leadership role in your agency, and assure success in your future transition.

       

       

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Semi-Advanced 12 Lead

       David Glendenning

      Interested in getting better or “Semi-advanced” at 12-leads? David will review the basics of 12-leads including A&P and acquisition issues.  Then, he’ll cover STEMI false activations and the “Top 10 Imposters” finishing up with more advanced findings in 12-lead cases and STEMI practice cases. Learners should have a good 12-lead ECG base knowledge prior to this session however it’s not required.

       

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Are “Hot” Responses Worth the Risk? 

       Matt Zavadsky

      The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration commissioned a comprehensive report on the benefits, risks and public perceptions of red light and siren responses.  This ground-breaking report challenges many of the perceptions of the benefits of HOT responses with empirical evidence and public perception.  The presenters will provide a summary of the report and provide attendees with specific recommendations to enhance provider and patient safety, while maintaining public trust.

       

      Learning Objectives:

      • Learn the clinical impact of response times.
      • Understand the risk to responders and the public of HOT responses.
      • Learn the key findings in the NHTSA Study on HOT responses.
      • Learn how to implement change in your agency.

       

       

      3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

      Push Dose Vasopressors-A Paramedics Field Guide

       Sam Dahl

      This presentation will discuss pathophysiology of vasopressors, when to use push-pressors, selection of the best vasopressor, realities of carrying pressors, and will utilize cases to illustrate the challenges of adding push-pressors to the paramedic’s arsenal of tricks. The case discussions will walk through a timeline from patient contact through stabilization and highlight the specific tasks needed to successfully manage hypotensive patients with pharmacology. Additionally, there will also be discussion of why medical directors and agency administrators get nervous about putting push-dose vasopressors in the drug box.

       

       

      Banquet – Tuesday, May 18, 2020

      Everyone is to be seated by 6:30 PM

      General Session – Wednesday, May 19, 2020

      9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

      What Lesson has EMS Learned from the Covid-19 Pandemic

      Matt Zavadsky

      The Coronavirus has changed our world, and EMS delivery, forever.  EMS’ role in the communities we serve, how we care for our workforce, and our approach to patient care delivery, has been dramatically transformed as a result of the pandemic.  What have been the major lessons for EMS through the COVID-19 pandemic and how can we leverage these lessons to enhance the EMS Transformation?  This direct, realistic, humorous and at times, controversial discussion will help attendees understand the positive ways the pandemic can shape the future of EMS delivery.

       

      Learning Objectives:

      • Learn the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare utilization, the EMS workforce, EMS response and transport volume, and the EMS role on local communities
      • Understand how to better prepare for pandemics in your local community
      • Learn how to leverage the role EMS played in the pandemic to future roles in your community

       

      Barbara Geiger

      Owner, Upton and Associates

      bugeiger@uptonassociates.com
      919-872-2224

      McKenzie C. Beamer

      Conference Coordinator

      ncexpo@dhhs.nc.gov 
      919-855-3935