2018 Registration is open!!

This schedule is subject to change.

Pre-Conference – Friday, September 28, 2018

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NAEMSE Instructor Course Level 1 (Day 1)

National Association of EMS Educators

The National EMS Instructor Courses have been designed and developed in accordance with the DOT/NHTSA 2002 National Guidelines for Educating EMS Instructors & the National Education Standards. The IC1 course represents the didactic component and practical application of the educational process for EMS educators specified in over 40 States EMS Rules.

To register for the course: https://naemse.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1123387&group= 

 You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits. 

 

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

National Registry Refresher (Day 1)

Carrie Gillilan

This course contains 15 of the 30 hours that are required for National content that can be applied when renewing an NREMT/NRP credential. Topics will include airway, cardiology, medical emergencies, environmental emergencies, OB, pediatrics, and other related national content.

Pre-Conference – Saturday, September 29, 2018

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Difficult Airway (Day 1)

Michael Keller

This course teaches simple airway algorithms that allow for an orderly, reproducible approach to any emergency airway.  This session allows for small group sessions including; airway device practice, decision-making skills and airway techniques.

To register for this course: https://www.regonline.com/registration/Checkin.aspx?EventID=2522028

You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits.

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

EMS Research Summit (Day 1)

Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research

The goal of the Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research is to contribute to the forward progression of the EMS profession through science and ultimately, by inspiring and empowering healthcare professionals to become researchers. The Research Summit allows us to come together to bring EMS providers and administrators, biostatisticians, and novices from across the healthcare spectrum to participate in group activities that promote learning about research while creating publishable abstracts. Research is an integral component of the EMS profession and ultimately determines how we as healthcare providers practice prehospital medicine. Your involvement today could lead to new discoveries that may change the way that EMS
responds to emergencies tomorrow. To quote Dr. Daniel Spate: “The future of EMS is indelibly linked to the future of EMS research. This reality provides EMS with its greatest opportunities, its greatest risks, and its greatest single need to depart from the ways of the past.”

As part of the process to be selected to attend the EMS Research Summit, we ask that you fill out the following questionnaire by August 25, 2018.

Applicants will be selected and notified for participation by September 1, 2018. The cost to attend the EMS Research Summit is $100.00, which will include a free shirt! A discount will be applied to those applicants who are active duty military personnel.

Link to application: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LHB2TNX

You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits.

8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Get Critical! Flight Paramedic Certification Exam Review (Day 1)

Sean Smith

Take your career to the next level with a very experienced educator with 20 years military and civilian aircrew, ER, and ICU experience… (including 6 years supporting NASA Space Shuttle launch and landings). I have helped hundreds pass their certification exams… will you be next? Join us and learn MORE than the theory that is on the FP-C exam…learn how those concepts are going to be clinically applied and tested in the certification exam environment… Learn and excel!

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NAEMSE Instructor Course Level 1 (Day 2)

National Association of EMS Educators

The National EMS Instructor Courses have been designed and developed in accordance with the DOT/NHTSA 2002 National Guidelines for Educating EMS Instructors & the National Education Standards. The IC1 course represents the didactic component and practical application of the educational process for EMS educators specified in over 40 States EMS Rules.

To register for the course: https://naemse.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1123387&group= 

 You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits. 

 

8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

National Registry Refresher (Day 2)

Carrie Gillilan

This course contains 15 of the 30 hours that are required for National content that can be applied when renewing an NREMT/NRP credential. Topics will include airway, cardiology, medical emergencies, environmental emergencies, OB, pediatrics, and other related national content.

8:00 AM – 1:00 PM

NEMSMA SUPERVISING OFFICER’S (SPO), MANAGING OFFICER’S (MPO), AND FELLOW IN THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF PARAMEDIC EXECUTIVES (FELLOW) CREDENTIALING EXAMINATION PREP COURSE

National EMS Management Association

This workshop will review the 7 Pillars of EMS Officer Competency knowledge areas in a scenario-based format, addressing the supervisory, managerial, and Fellow levels in each pillar. It will also include a review of the written examination and the Managing Officer’s and Fellow’s oral boards format and style, providing a review of how to interpret the questions and the critical thinking process to use in selecting and composing answers. In addition, this program reviews the third requirement of Fellow credentialing, the portfolio, describing its elements and scoring rubric.

This course does not include NOT include the examinations referenced. Attendees of the Prep Course will only be eligible to sit for the credentialing exams offered at NC EMS Expo on Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 8:00 a.m.– 1:00 p.m. if they are qualified and have submitted an accepted application in advance. The application deadline for testing at NC EMS Expo is August 31. Registration for the Prep Course will be accepted until Friday, September 28, 2018.

Candidates for testing may take the Prep Course in conjunction with testing or separately.

 Registration for the prep course and exam is separate from conference registration.

Use this link to register for the Prep Course and/or the Supervising Officer (SPO), Managing Officer (MPO), or Fellow exams: https://nemsma.candidatecare.jobs/job_positions/browse#collapse0

You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits.

 

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Crisis Intervention Team Course (Day 1)

Tara Tucker

The Crisis Intervention Team program teaches first responders practical skills to help them interact safely and effectively with persons with mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disability needs. The curriculum includes information about common signs and symptoms of behavioral health concerns, information about community resources, opportunities to hear from individuals and family members, and training in de-escalation and crisis intervention. The goals of CIT are to promote the safe resolution of crises, to divert individuals from jail and the emergency department, and to offer community members access to care and opportunities for service engagement.

To register for this course: https://terms.ncem.org/TRS/courseDesc.do?sourcePage=courseSearch&cofId=111598

 You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits.

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Self Protection for Emergency Medical Services

Regional Proving Grounds, LLC

The Self-Protection for EMS curriculum was designed to provide EMS personnel with basic skills to protect themselves from less-lethal assaults. In the United States, there is approximately 800,000 EMS personnel that respond to over 30 million calls for assistance each year. A growing body of research shows that EMS personnel have high levels of occupational risk comparable to police officers and firefighters and violence against EMS personnel has been shown as a significant contributor to this risk (Magure, O’Meara, O’Neill, & Brightwell, 2017).

This training focuses on how attackers think, the process they go through when deciding to attack, recognition of pre-assaultive indicators, basic skills of self-protection, and exposure to liability and the legal limits for protecting oneself against an imminent assault.

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

EMS Trauma Moulage Training Workshop

Moulage Concepts, Inc.

Biohazard, Chemical, Trauma Moulage Workshop with focused exercise training opportunity, operational support development, techniques and skill assistance to strengthen scenario based training exercise.

Includes:

Course Supplies

Trial/Practice Starter Kit $125.00

Moulage workshop with focused exercise training opportunity, support development, safety and developed exercise support in portrayal of operational environment training tools, techniques and skills.

To register for this course: https://www.moulageconcepts.com/training

  You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits.

 

30 Students Maximum

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

EMS Chief 101

Office of EMS Staff

This program is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of information and resource materials to current and future EMS & Rescue chiefs and officers.  Through the facilitation of discussion, audience participation, and various presentations of information, participants will receive information and an understanding of various aspects, concepts, resources, regulations and complexities involving the organization, administration, operations and management of North Carolina EMS and Rescue departments and agencies. This program is being offered as a cooperative partnership of the NC Association of EMS Administrators, NC Office of Emergency Medical Services, and the NC Association of Rescue-EMS.

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

OEMS Instructor Workshop

Office of EMS Education Staff

This Workshop will discuss current and future issues within the Education of EMS Providers in North Carolina. The presentation and discussion will be facilitated by the current OEMS Educational Specialist (CRO, ERO and WRO). Topics to be covered will include and are not limited to the following: EMS Educational Programs, OEMS Level I and Level II Instructors, EMS Educational Institutions, TSOP, Students OEMS Written Testing, Legal Recognition, Expired Credentials, NCOEMS Website, Continuum and other various topics relative to EMS Education. This session will count as 4 hours of Professional Development.

You must register through Reg-Online to be able to receive continuing education credits for this course.  Click on the “Register Now” button at the top of the page. 

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

NEMSMA SUPERVISING OFFICER (SPO), MANAGING OFFICER (MPO), AND FELLOW CREDENTIALING EXAMS

National EMS Management Association

The credentialing written examinations for NEMSMA Supervising Officer (SPO), Managing Officer (MPO), and Fellow in the American College of Paramedic Executives (Fellow). Only applicants who are qualified and have submitted an accepted application in advance will be eligible to sit for the credentialing exams at NC EMS Expo . The application deadline for testing at NC EMS Expo is August 31.

Registration for the credentialing exams is separate from conference registration.

 Use this link to register for the credentialing exams: https://nemsma.candidatecare.jobs/job_positions/browse#collapse0 

 You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits.

Pre-Conference – Sunday, September 30, 2018

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Difficult Airway (Day 2)

Michael Keller

This course teaches simple airway algorithms that allow for an orderly, reproducible approach to any emergency airway.  This session allows for small group sessions including; airway device pratice, decision-making skills and airway technigues.

8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Get Critical! Flight Paramedic Certification Exam Review (Day 2)

Sean Smith

Take your career to the next level with a very experienced educator with 20 years military and civilian aircrew,ER, and ICU experience… (including 6 years supporting NASA Space Shuttle launch and landings). I have helped hundreds pass their certification exams… will you be next? Join us and learn MORE than the theory that is on the FP-C exam…learn how those concepts are going to be clinically applied and tested in the certification exam environment… Learn and excel!

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

EMS Research Summit (Day 2)

Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research

The goal of the Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research is to contribute to the forward progression of the EMS profession through science and ultimately, by inspiring and empowering healthcare professionals to become researchers. The Research Summit allows us to come together to bring EMS providers and administrators, biostatisticians, and novices from across the healthcare spectrum to participate in group activities that promote learning about research while creating publishable abstracts. Research is an integral component of the EMS profession and ultimately determines how we as healthcare providers practice prehospital medicine. Your involvement today could lead to new discoveries that may change the way that EMS responds to emergencies tomorrow. To quote Dr. Daniel Spate: “The future of EMS is indelibly linked to the future of EMS research. This reality provides EMS with its greatest opportunities, its greatest risks, and its greatest single need to depart from the ways of the past.”

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NAEMSE Instructor Course Level 1 (Day 3)

Chris Nollette

The National EMS Instructor Courses have been designed and developed in accordance with the DOT/NHTSA 2002 National Guidelines for Educating EMS Instructors & the National Education Standards. The IC1 course represents the didactic component and practical application of the educational process for EMS educators specified in over 40 States EMS Rules.

 

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Crisis Intervention Team Course (Day 2)

Tara Tucker

The Crisis Intervention Team program teaches first responders practical skills to help them interact safely and effectively with persons with mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disability needs. The curriculum includes information about common signs and symptoms of behavioral health concerns, information about community resources, opportunities to hear from individuals and family members, and training in de-escalation and crisis intervention. The goals of CIT are to promote the safe resolution of crises, to divert individuals from jail and the emergency department, and to offer community members access to care and opportunities for service engagement.

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Handtevy Pre-Hospital Pediatric Instructor Course

 Pediatric Emergency Standards, Inc.

The Handtevy Pre-Hospital Pediatric Instructor Course is an 8-hour live lecture and hands-on course that is intended to certify instructors to teach the Handtevy Pre-Hospital Pediatric Provider Course at their department and earn credit. The course uses the basic tenets of ACLS training as the foundation while still covering the basic pediatric ALS principles and nuisances. The course focuses on the skills needed to rapidly and accurately treat the sick and injured pediatric patient and is intended to be used with the Handtevy Pediatric System.

Register for the course: https://www.handtevy.com/courses/ 

You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits. 

 

20 Students Maximum

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Transport Ventilators-Freshman Class: The Basics of Mechanical Ventilators

Michael Berrier

Most patients transported by air and ground require some level of respiratory support, with many of those dependent on mechanical ventilation. And, for paramedics and nurses alike transitioning to critical care transport, one of the steepest learning curves is managing the ventilator. This one-day course will introduce pulmonary physiology as well as ventilator modes, types, and settings. We will use lecture, group discussion, and hands-on work with a popular transport ventilator to understand the terminology, buttons, knobs, and alarms and help you begin your journey to ventilator mastery.

20 Students Maximum

8:00 AM – 9:45 AM

So You Want To Be An Instructor?

Reuben Farnsworth

Are you ready to share your knowledge with other EMS providers but don’t know where to start? Too often, there is a misconception that all you need is a laptop and a powerpoint to be on your way. We will talk about some of the pitfalls that can befall new instructors and ways to avoid them. Be prepared for a discussion about learning types, methodologies, and use of various mediums in EMS instruction. Whether you are an old hand or a new instructor, this course has something for everyone. Why be an ordinary instructor, when you can be a RockStar Instructor?
Objectives:
1. The student will identify common difficulties that new instructors face.
2. The student will describe how to effectively engage their students.

10:15 AM-12:00 PM

Millennials Are Making Me Crazy: Managing the Millennial Workforce

Reuben Farnsworth

There is a new generation of workers in EMS, and many members of the administrative team are struggling to interface with them. We will talk about the ways in which millennial workers differ from their more seasoned co-workers. We can either learn to interface or we can #DealWithIt for the next 20 years until the millennial
generation is running management. Come join the discussion and improve your communication with the younger generation.
Objectives:
1. The student will be able to identify differences in how the millennial generation view their careers.
2. The student will be able to list methods of improving communication with the millennial generation.

8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
WFBMC

Cadaver Teaching Lab (Morning Session)

Jeff Hinshaw

The paramedic advanced skills lab is a 4-hour hands-on session where students are taught high-risk EMS procedures under the guidance of EMS Physicians.  The students will perform procedures on fresh human tissue to gain a better understanding of the anatomic and procedural considerations of the skills.  The skills reviewed include but are not limited to:  basic and advanced airway management, surgical airway management, artificial airway considerations, chest tube placement/needle decompression, IO line placement, and active hemorrhage control.  4 hours of CE credit will be offered from the Wake Forest Center for Experiential and Applied Learning.   The session will occur at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem.

Register for the course: https://paramedicskills.regfox.com/hands-on-sept2018  

You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits. 

30 Students Maximum

 

1:30 PM – 5:30 PM
WFBMC

Cadaver Teaching Lab (Afternoon Session)

Jeff Hinshaw

The paramedic advanced skills lab is a 4-hour hands-on session where students are taught high-risk EMS procedures under the guidance of EMS Physicians.  The students will perform procedures on fresh human tissue to gain a better understanding of the anatomic and procedural considerations of the skills.  The skills reviewed include but are not limited to:  basic and advanced airway management, surgical airway management, artificial airway considerations, chest tube placement/needle decompression, IO line placement, and active hemorrhage control.  4 hours of CE credit will be offered from the Wake Forest Center for Experiential and Applied Learning.   The session will occur at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem.

 Register for the course: https://paramedicskills.regfox.com/hands-on-sept2018

You must also register for NC EMS Expo if you wish to receive continuing education credits. 

 30 Students Maximum

General Sessions – Monday, October 1, 2018

9:00 AM – 9:15 AM
Guilford F/G

To Be Determined

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM
Guilford F/G

To Be Determined

11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Guilford F/G

To Be Determined

Concurrent Sessions – Monday, October 1, 2018

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Crisis Intervention Team Course (Day 3)

Tara Tucker

The Crisis Intervention Team program teaches first responders practical skills to help them interact safely and effectively with persons with mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disability needs. The curriculum includes information about common signs and symptoms of behavioral health concerns, information about community resources, opportunities to hear from individuals and family members, and training in de-escalation and crisis intervention. The goals of CIT are to promote the safe resolution of crises, to divert individuals from jail and the emergency department, and to offer community members access to care and opportunities for service engagement.

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

EMS Program Director Update

Mike Price

This course will serve as an opportunity for Program Directors of EMS Education to be able to receive updates in regards to the NC Community College System, best practices, and course review. This is an opportunity to share best practices and for Program Directors to network with each other. This course is offered in conjunction with
updates from the NC Association of EMS Educators.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

EMS, the Internet, and Social Media: Time to Get Engaged

Dan Greenhaus

Departments have the ability to directly address the public, field questions, and give the public a window into what we do, our job, and how we put their tax dollars to good work. This presentation will help explain the benefits of having an official social media presence and an official website. During the presentation,, we will review two styles of official websites. Lastly, we will cover the dangers of SMACSS (Social Media Assisted Career Suicide Syndrome), and how to prevent it from negatively reflecting the department.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Complications! Cases of Patient Deterioration

Kevin Collopy

Sometimes, even when a protocol is followed, patients deteriorate. Every medical procedure comes with risks of complications; when complications do occur, patients suffer. While complications don’t mean someone made a mistake, its easy for a clinician to doubt their own care after the complication occurs. This presentation
discusses several common prehospital and emergency department interventions, the known complications, and their evidence-based frequency. After presenting the data behind the complication rates of common prehospital interventions, you’ll hear about three actual cases where things went wrong: hypotension following rapid
sequence intubation, intracerebral hemorrhage following fibrinolytics, and respiratory arrest following analgesia and sedation. Hear how clinicians managed their patient’s complications and how structured support was provided following each complication to help support the involved crew members to help improve the care
of the crew members and their entire system.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

The Top 10 Things Your Legal Counsel Wants You to Know

Allison J. Bloom

There are a few really important things you should keep in mind as you deal with the day-to-day issues that arise in EMS. Allison J. Bloom, an EMS industry attorney, will point out ten of them for you. You’ll want to take notes to share with colleagues and commit these to memory.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Closed Head Injuries

Bob Page

Head injury management is rapidly changing on all fronts. This talk is designed to update the EMS provider on the latest controversies in the acute management of closed head injury. Ideas such as hyperventilation, use of capnography, BLS things that drive up the ICP, and more. This session is much, much more than the standard head injury lecture. New stuff is presented for all levels and you will leave with a clear understanding of ICP or one huge headache! (just kidding!)

Session Objectives

  1. Describe the mechanisms of injury related to closed head injury.
  2. Describe the pathophysiology of increasing intracranial pressure.
  3. Describe the assessment findings and recommended management for ICP.
1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Hospice Care in EMS: Things You Never Know Until You Have to Do

Reuben Farnsworth

Medic 41 please respond to 911 Emergency Way for a 54-year-old female with terminal breast cancer and agonal breathing. When you arrive the patient’s husband tells you that he thinks his wife is dying and she has a DNR. What do you do now, why are you even here? In this course, we will talk about the complicated social dynamic
that can exist with hospice patients as well as how to handle these often difficult encounters.
Objectives:
1. The student will be able to list complications that can arise with hospice patients.
2. The student will be able to identify methods to deal with end of life situations.
3. The student will be able to explain how to provide end of life pain management
4. The student will be able to list techniques used to communicate with the family in these situations.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Community Paramedicine and Respiratory Illness: Educating Our Patients Better

Suzanne King

This session outlines the use of Community Paramedicine to treat patients with congestive heart failure, COPD, and pneumonia once discharged home from the hospital. We will discuss the lessons learned over the last three years of the program, as well as where we are going from here. The CHF Initiative, medication program and
pharmacy partnership, and the education have been invaluable in the reduction of admissions and cost savings.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

TBD

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Recruitment, Retention, and Why Not All Turnover is Bad…and How to Keep Good Employees

Dan Greenhaus

Do you have plenty of extra staff, no open positions, and aren’t anticipating hiring until someone retires? Then this topic isn’t for you. For the rest of us, we will discuss some business practices to help you retain good staff, hire long-term productive employees, as well as discuss some common situations that cause good employees to see employment elsewhere, as well as when you should wish them the best of luck in their future endeavors, with no hard feelings.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Community Paramedicine and Population Health Management

Robyn McArdle

In this presentation, we will discuss how community paramedicine can be merged into a community health care model for population health management. With health care changes constantly on the horizon, is it essential for healthcare providers, administrators, and public health professionals to be constantly looking for
ways to integrate care management models.  By doing so we can identify the most efficient ways to provide consistent, optimal care both during the inpatient and outpatient settings. This presentation will focus on the following specific topics: community paramedicine, integrated care management of high-risk populations, and population health.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Electronics in EMS: Treat Your Patient, Not Your App

Reuben Farnsworth

Have you ever done a search on the app store for Paramedic apps? There are countless apps that will do everything from calculate stroke scores to performing 12 leads. Which apps are right for you and do they have a place in your ambulance? There are some excellent apps and we can use them in EMS. Join us as we discuss and evaluate the use of apps in EMS.
Objectives:
1. The student will be able to identify issues that can arise from app usage in the field.
2. The student will be able to explain how apps can improve their patient care.
3. The student will be able to compare and contrast the need to balance the use of technology within the pt. care paradigm.
4. The student will be able to identify specific situations which necessitate maintaining excellent assessment skills independent of their technological devices.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Respiratory Interactive

Bob Page

Who says medical lectures have to be boring? This one Rocks! This session is presented in a game show atmosphere where the audience interacts with clickers throughout the session. This case-based session walks the participant through some tough respiratory calls from CHF, to COPD and Asthma while teams gather points along the way. Join edutainer Bob Page as he moderates the action and reviews in a rather unique way, the respiratory system and review the pathophysiology of common respiratory emergencies and assessment techniques.

By the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

  1. Identify, given a set of assessment data, the specific respiratory condition associated with that data.
  2. Describe normal physiology of the respiratory system
  3. Given a disease process, identify the likely signs and symptoms a patient would display.
3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Back to Basics, Think/Pair/Share

Kirk Mittelman and Margaret Mittelman

Academia is turning to technology as a means of teaching to reach the maximum number of students and keep up with an ever-changing world. More classes are being offered online and we are getting away from face to face teaching. Departments are jumping on the bandwagon and using technology to deliver continuing education. Is it
time to get back to basics and actually work side by side with our students? Have we taken technology forward while forgetting our student’s needs? In this session, we will explore the need to work side by side with students and get back to basics. These basics include making a difference in our student psychomotor and affective domains through face to face teaching. In their special and entertaining way, Kirk and Margaret will provide exercises that will improve your time in face to face classes. This class will take you beyond lectures and into the realm of working to improve your students’ outcome and resiliency in EMS. Join Kirk and Margaret to explore the Basic way to change your students and make them lifelong EMS professionals.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Lou Gerhigs Disease and the EMS Professional

Lisa Hoskins

This session provides an overview of ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease, treatment and intervention options and ALS Association NC Chapter programs as well as emphasis on unique considerations for Emergency Medical Professionals when working with ALS professionals.

Concurrent Sessions – Tuesday, October 2, 2018

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Crisis Intervention Team Course (Day 4)

Tara Tucker

The Crisis Intervention Team program teaches first responders practical skills to help them interact safely and effectively with persons with mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disability needs. The curriculum includes information about common signs and symptoms of behavioral health concerns, information about community resources, opportunities to hear from individuals and family members, and training in de-escalation and crisis intervention. The goals of CIT are to promote the safe resolution of crises, to divert individuals from jail and the emergency department, and to offer community members access to care and opportunities for service engagement.

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Making Continuing Education Purposeful

Steven Howell

EMS Education and Training has become a driving force in EMS system today, however the day of PowerPoints and
lectures are dying. Come join us as we review how you can incorporate technology into your EMS lectures and training
for both new hires and experienced staff. Review how current events and Performance Improvement issues can drive
education and how your educational department can do more for education with less cost and expense. Utilizing
technology, employee feedback, and new research and trends will continue to drive and change EMS and EMS
Education as our profession evolves, come be a part of the push for change.

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Cameras in Ambulances: What You Should Know Before Recording

Allison J. Bloom

There has been a lot of discussions lately about the use of audio and/or video recording for EMS calls. Cameras
used at the scene and in the ambulance can help improve scene safety, provide real-time documentation, and
be used for quality improvement. But, there are ethical, privacy and legal considerations which must be
addressed before putting cameras on EMS personnel and vehicles. This dynamic session by an experienced EMS
attorney will address the legal and ethical issues of the balance between patient privacy and EMS operations.

 

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Helping Rural Communities with a Telemedicine Assist

Bobby Park

Rural EMS agencies will always face different challenges when compared to their urban counterparts. Many
times, Rural EMS providers are the only way in which their citizens can access healthcare quickly and without
transport barriers, often resulting in a higher than normal number of consults initiated for non-emergent health
issues. Through an integration of virtual access to emergency medicine physicians and rural paramedics, a small
agency with limited resources can provide a greater array of care to their service area while still remaining
completely and immediately available to citizens starting true emergency consults. During this session, we’ll
describe ways in which 24/7 virtual access to skilled emergency medicine providers can not only impact an
entire EMS service area, but also the paramedics who staff it. We’ll explore specific examples, share how to
easily implement something that sounds complicated, and provide a real-life case study that proves the method.

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

The Opioid Crisis Hits Home

Kirk Mittelman

We have all seen it, just too late! We may have a loved one who has the problem, but don’t want to say anything.
Ignoring it won’t help, but saying something means we have a problem. Did you actually enable the addict by
ignoring the issue? Admitting to it means we have failed in our quest to be perfect. Why is drug and alcohol
addiction so prevalent in our profession? Can we make a difference through education and leadership by
changing our own outlook and attitudes?
In teaching, workplaces and homes we lose excellent professionals to addiction every day. They may go on to
right their own ship, but most do not. Administrators, educators and workers need to step up and help our own.
Recognizing the problem is our first step in helping our students, staff and co-workers through recovery. The
second step is educating students and employees of the danger that is around the corner. As leaders and
educators, we have an obligation to take care of our own and not cast them aside. Join Kirk and Margaret for a
candid conversation about saving our profession from addiction through education and recognition. Don’t ignore
the problem, become part of the solution by learning and helping our students, employees and co-workers avoid
and beat addiction.

 

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Developing an EMS Agency Suicide Prevention Plan

Ned Fowler

This interactive discussion will raise awareness of the incidence and impact of responder suicide within EMS agencies, raise awareness of proven suicide prevention strategies developed by the US military and other industries, and identify pro-active steps that EMS agencies can take to develop a comprehensive suicide prevention plan.

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Treat ’em Right: Customer Service in EMS

Rory Putnam

Most of us don’t think of customer service in the EMS field the same way we do in other industries. However, we
should, because the last word in our name is ‘Service’. This class will help you identify EMS/ambulance service
customers and better understand the needs of those customers above the obvious medical care. We will look into the need and methods for quality improvement in EMS, identify different methods of responding to customer needs; through patient medical care, caring for family, friends, and understand the overall impact of effective customer services. Finally, it will address the impact on EMS providers of the jobs we do,
related stresses and the ways we can improve our lives by CISM and other stress-reducing programs in order to excel at customer service and make every patient encounter good for them and us, truly making a difference!

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

Team Wellness: Caring for Our Brothers and Sisters in Blue 

Diane Miller

Serving as a tactical medical provider goes beyond caring for injuries sustained during a mission. Tactical medics
are also responsible for overall team wellness, both physical and mental. Through careful planning and regular
training with a team, the tactical medic can gain the trust of their team members and address needs to help
keep operators in the fight.

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

Where’s My 12-Lead…Of the Brain? 

Michael Whitehurst

A 12 lead EKG is a great tool to identify the location of the AMI within the heart. These findings help to prioritize and triage the care of these patients. Wouldn’t it be great if a similar tool could be utilized for the acute stroke patient?
Your physical exam findings can be used for just this purpose. At a time when EMS providers can utilize the Cincinnati or Los Angeles screenings, and even the RACE scoring system, assessment of the acute stroke patient can be confusing for pre-hospital and emergency providers. With limited treatment options for acute stroke patients combined with a narrow window of time to initiate those treatments, it is important that your assessment is providing you the guidance needed to make the right call for these patients. Yes, time is muscle AND time is brain…now take some time to learn more about how your assessments can be life changing for your stroke patients.

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

What’s That In My Patient? The Good, The Bad, The Implanted

Reuben Farnsworth

This course takes a look at all the gadgets our patients have to aid their medical situation. We will cover
common devices that are implanted and attached, while discussing common issues with these devices and the
best methods for EMS providers to assist in their operation or malfunction.
Objectives:
1. The student will be able to identify common implanted devices.
2. The student will be able to troubleshoot common problems with implanted devices and recognize normal
function.

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

What are We Really? The Changing Paradigm of Small Communities in EMS

Rory Putnam

EMS is still young, having been born only in the 1970s. But we are a profession that is ever-changing and adapting
to the world of emergency healthcare. Many people debate whether we are public safety, healthcare, public health or something else. This class will look at the different missions we have as EMS personnel and dispel the myths that we are merely here for emergency responses. We will also discuss the reality of what we should be doing in EMS, drawing from Rory’s own experiences as a current Paramedic and Educator and former Chief officer for small towns in Maine. It will explore the very real truths that because of low call volumes, we should embrace new programs like Community Paramedicine, education, public awareness/relations, safety campaigns and student EMS programs to prevent injury and illness, and promote youth entering this noble field. These programs have a positive impact on increasing funding and support by expanding knowledge of what we do in our communities.

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

TBD

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

Medical Director Update – Part 1

Tripp Winslow

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Behind the Mask

Brook Price

We are there at a moments notice to answer the call. That’swhat we signed up for right? But, are we there for
ourselves? What happens when the calls that were out of our control turn into sleepless nights days and months.
What happens when our relationships fail under pressure and the one drink turns into 1, 2, 3, 4. With the alarming rise of suicide in our profession, we cannot afford to sit quietly any longer. It’s time we stood up and started taking care of ourselves if we don’t who will? In this presentation, you will learn practical coping mechanisms to deal with the everyday stressors of our Profession.

 

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Diabetes for Dummies, Part Deux

Brendan McGurk

In the four years since the original Diabetes for Dummies, the acute and chronic management of diabetes has
changed tremendously. From a bevy of promising new medications to insulin pumps that now function semi-
autonomously, diabetic patients are using numerous new therapies to manage their disease. Additionally, the
management strategies for acute hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia have changed significantly, requiring some
updated practices for prehospital providers. This presentation will review the relevant information as well as
provide a hands-on look at the newest generation of insulin pumps and continous glucose monitors.
1. Upon completion of this lecture, the participant will have a better understanding of the new treatment
modalities for insulin-dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetes.
2. Upon completion of this lecture, the participant will have greater familiarity with current insulin pumps and
continuous glucose monitors, as well as how to manage them in emergent situations.
3. Upon completion of this lecture, the participant will better understand the appropriate management of
hypoglycemic patients and the downsides of classical management strategies.
4. Upon completion of this lecture, the participant will better understand the appropriate management of
acutely hyperglycemic patients, including those with DKA and HHS.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Teach Public How to “Control the Bleed”

Alex Tremain

Motivated by the 2012 tragedy in Sandy Hook and multiple tragedies that have occurred in the ensuing years, what has become known as the Hartford Consensus was convened to bring together leaders from law enforcement, the federal government, and the medical community to improve survivability from manmade or natural mass casualty events. The resulting injuries from these events generally present with severe bleeding which, if left unattended, can result in death. The participants of the Hartford Consensus concluded that by providing first responders (law enforcement) and civilian bystanders the skills and basic tools to stop uncontrolled bleeding in an emergency situation, lives would be saved. The first responder program has received a very good response and is widely being used across the country. The next step is to focus on needs of civilian bystanders. This Course must be completed by anyone interested in teaching to the public. Information on becoming an instructor will be provided along with a certificate of completion.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

How Data Drives Success

Steven Howell

Data Drives Success! We all know in the healthcare world today that data is invaluable. Data can change cardiac
arrest processes, support funding for EMS expansion, add or remove equipment, and ultimately improve your
service and the surrounding community. Take a moment to review how New Hanover Regional EMS and the
Performance Improvement Department utilize data on a daily basis to drive success. These everyday processes
can make an EMS agency more successful. We will review how CPR feedback is driving success in EMS, Airway
statistics are changing training and education for patients, and ultimately how patient outcomes are improved.

 

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

Medical Director Update – Part 2

Tripp Winslow

 

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM

To Be Determined

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Reflections on the Loss of the Life Flight Three

Brendan McGurk and Christina Shelton

How do you respond to the worst day imaginable for your program? Duke Life Flight was faced with this very
question when it experienced the tragic loss of three crew members and a patient on September 8th, 2017. Over
the next several months, the Duke Life Flight family faced a number of dark days and we were forced to develop
the resiliency required to continue our mission. In honor of the crew of Life Flight Three and to repay the
immense support we received from the HEMS and wider EMS community, we want to share some of our
experiences and the lessons that we learned. Our goal is to help prepare others for the day that we all hope
never comes.

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

What Were We Thinking? Critical Pediatric Calls

Kirk Mittelman

Too often we get tunnel vision and miss the signs and symptoms we are trained to find. On a regular basis, we go
on a pediatric call and wonder “What Were You Thinking?” Kids are no different from adults, they do things that
make us ponder what was going through their heads before the accident.
During this session, we will evaluate critical calls and what might have changed the outcome before we got the
call for help. We will also look at patient and EMS thinking while on calls. What is critical thinking and how can I
use it to better my pediatric patient outcomes? Grab your TOPHAT and join Kirk for a session filled with videos
and case histories to help improve your Pediatric Critical Thinking Skills and begin to answer the question: “What
were they thinking?”.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Adrenaline, Antibiotics, Abnormal Saline: The Big Science of Emergency Management in 2018

Michael Berrier and Jeff Hinshaw

There are lies, more lies and then, there is (ab)normal saline.  In 2018 dynamic research reported or continues to investigate topics close to EMS like the role of saline, sepsis treatment, epinephrine in cardiac arrest, opioid antidotes and of course, airway management.  If you have any kind of life at all, you might have missed some of it.  Fortunately for you, Michale and Jeff really don’t. That’s why they’ve spent the past year scouring the listerature, case reports and there own experieneces to bring you the most impactful developments in EMS and related fields from the past year.  Join us again and bring your questions and thoughts as we work together to set a course.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

EMS Research: A Year in Review 

Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research

This session focuses on a review of the research abstracts produced and published as a result of EMS research
summits held by the Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research. Come join us to hear presentations from the
primary investigators about what we have discovered! Through our collaborative research summits, the
Foundation for Prehospital Medicine Research has helped in the production of many quality research projects
throughout the year that were accepted for presentation, publication, or both! This session allows the Primary
Investigators involved in the studies to give a brief presentation on their research, including how the results may
be impactful to different aspects of the EMS profession. Time will be provided in between presentations for
attendees to ask questions and discuss results.

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Using the Affective Domain to Determine Goodness of New Hire Fit

Sara Houston and Max Patterson

Despite our efforts to choose the best applicants, the process continues to be influenced by the applicant’s best
performance. Once our new hire Academy began, we discovered that a few of the recruits may not actually have
been as good a fit as we originally had hoped. By using the Affective Domain as a measure of recruit performance
in our new hire Academy, we have managed to strengthen the culture within our organization and save time and
money in the process. We discovered that by monitoring the affect of our recruits, we have been able to protect
the organization and the community we serve from employees who would have not otherwise been an asset to
our culture and our workforce. The recruits our Academy have produced continue to be active, engaged
employees within the organization.

 

3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Effectively Using Post Overdose Response Teams and Alternate Destinations

Tara Tucker

Overdoses occur in businesses and homes across all neighborhoods with EMS being at the forefront of these
scenes. All of us have a role in addressing the opioid epidemic. It takes local officials, first responders and
members of the community working together to implement solutions that will make a real difference for those
battling a substance use disorder. First responders can be a vital link to helping connect overdose patients to life
saving treatment through Post-Overdose Response Teams. Learn more about how such teams allow community
partners and first responders to provide overdose prevention education to residents who may not be engaged in
services and offer access to a range of recovery support services, including treatment.

 

Banquet – Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Everyone is to be seated by 6:30 PM

General Session – Wednesday, October 3, 2018

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

To Be Determined

Barbara Geiger
Upton Associates
bugeiger@uptonassociates.com
919-872-2224

Debra Nichols
Registration Coordinator
Debra.A.Nichols@dhhs.nc.gov
919-855-3935